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Friday, March 31, 2023

Families are kept in the dark by Saudi executions that are kept secret.

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Families in Saudi Arabia are kept in the dark about executions that are carried out by the government. Families are not informed about the arrest or execution of their loved ones, meaning that they have no way of knowing if their loved ones are safe or not. In fact, it is not uncommon for families to learn about an execution only after it has taken place. This secretive policy has led to a number of wrongful executions and torture, as families are left without any closure or justice. As a result, families are speaking up and demanding change.

A new human rights report says that since 2015, when King Salman and his son Mohammed bin Salman took control, the country’s execution rate has almost doubled.

Since 2015, when King Salman and his son Mohammed bin Salman took control of Saudi Arabia, the country’s execution rate has almost doubled. Families are kept in the dark by Saudi executions that are kept secret.

According to a new report from the human rights group Reprieve, since 2015 the Saudi government has carried out at least 165 executions, which is more than double the number of executions that occurred in the previous five years combined. The majority of these executions have been of political prisoners, including members of dissent groups and religious minorities.

The secrecy surrounding these executions means that most families don’t even know their loved ones have been killed. This can lead to huge emotional and financial burdens for survivors and their families, who are left struggling to cope with what they’ve lost.

We need to send a clear message to the Saudis that this kind of cruelty will not be tolerated. We need them to stop Executing political prisoners without any due process and start allowing families to know what happened to their loved ones.

According to Reprieve, Saudi Arabia carried out 147 executions in the previous year, but the number could have been higher.

According to Reprieve, Saudi Arabia carried out 147 executions in the previous year, but the number could have been higher. Many of these executions are carried out without any notice given to the families of the victim, making it difficult for them to mount a proper legal challenge. This secrecy means that there is no way of knowing how many people were executed unnecessarily or in cold blood.

The situation is made even more difficult by the fact that Saudi Arabia does not publish information about its executions. The country only releases vague figures about executions which make it very hard to track down exact numbers and verify whether they reflect reality or not.

This lack of transparency paints an inaccurate picture of Saudi Arabia’s human rights record and undermines public confidence in its judicial system. It also fuels international concern about the kingdom’s future trajectory as a responsible member of the global community.

In 2014, he was detained. An official announcement stated that he, along with thirty other people,

In 2014, Saudi Arabia executed thirty-seven people, including Mohammad al-Qahtani. Mohammad al-Qahtani was arrested in 2012 and was charged with participating in an anti-government protest. His family was kept in the dark about his execution; an official announcement stated that he, along with thirty other people, had been executed.

Mohammad al-Qahtani’s death is one of many executions that are kept secret by Saudi Arabia. The country has a history of executing dissidents and political opponents, and its secretive executions have led to criticism from human rights organizations. The country has also been criticized for its lack of progress in reform efforts.

Maya Foa, Reprieve’s director, tells me from her east London office that the crown prince, also known as MBS, has “done the exact opposite of what he promised.”

Secret Saudi executions
Maya Foa, Reprieve’s director, tells me from her east London office that the crown prince, also known as MBS, has “done the exact opposite of what he promised.”

Saudi Arabia carried out at least 150 secret executions this year and many more than in previous years – despite Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s repeated promises to reform his country’s justice system. Families are kept in the dark by these executions that are kept secret.

In January 2018, MBS announced plans to end death sentences and to give prisoners a choice between prison and rehabilitation. But instead of ending the use of beheadings and other cruel methods, as he had said he would, he has presided over an intensification of executions.

MBS is responsible for carrying out these secret executions – even though they break international human rights law. In December 2017, Amnesty International published a report accusing him of waging a ‘war on dissent’.

“The sheer scale of the secret executions is alarming,” said Maya Foa, Reprieve’s director. “They are taking place in direct violation of MBS’s pledge to reform Saudi Arabia’s justice system – which was supposed to be based on evidence and compassion.”

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